How to increase your state pension using your husband’s National Insurance record.
Many women don't realise that they have the right to claim a state pension based on their husband's National Insurance record, even if they're divorced.

Updated August 30th 2012

Government figures show that around 25% of women don't get the full basic state pension when they retire. OK so the state pension may not be a fortune at around £107 a week, but for many people (especially women) it's the bedrock of the money they live on in retirement. If you haven't paid enough National Insurance to get a full pension you may be able to claim a pension, worth up to 60% of the full basic state pension, based on your husband's NI record. What's more you can still do it even if you're divorced.

Finding out about your state pension
The way the state pension works is that everyone can qualify for a full state pension of 107.45 a week (tax year 2012-13) as long as they've made enough National Insurance contributions. If your husband has a better NI contributions record than you do, you'll be better off claiming under his record.

• It will depend on how long you've worked for, how much you earned (if you earn less than the lower earnings limit, you don't pay NI) and whether you were credited for years spent looking after your children or caring for relatives.

• Under the rules introduced on April 6th 2010, women (and men) must pay or be credited with NI for 30 years to get a full basic state pension. You can get an indication of the state pension you may be entitled to by filling in the state pension profiler.

SAVVY TIP: If you've taken time off work to look after your children, you may have received home responsibilities protection (which essentially credits you for time when you've been looking after your children).

• Ask for a forecast of the pension you are in line to receive. A state pension forecast, is something you can apply for online or by phone.

Claiming on your husband's National Insurance record
If you haven't paid enough NI to receive a full basic state pension in your own right, you can claim on your husband's (or ex husband's) National Insurance record.

• You'll receive a pension worth 60% of his. If he's entitled to the full basic state pension that means you'd receive a pension of over 64 a week (in tax year 2012/13).

SAVVY TIP: From April 6th 2010, a man has been able to claim on his wife's NI record and civil partners will be able to claim on each other's if the wife or civil partner was born after April 6th 1950. In reality, it's unlikely that many men would be better off claiming on their wife's NI record, although for some, it may be a help.

• Always ask how you can maximise your state pension. Find out whether you'd be better off claiming under your husband or ex husband's National Insurance record rather than under your own.

SAVVY TIP: I've checked this with the Department for Work and Pensions, which says that if you're married, you won't be given information about whether or not you'd be better off claiming the state pension under your husband's NI record. If you're divorced, you should be given that information. If you want advice on what to do, call the Pensions Advisory Service on 0845 6012923.

• Find out whether your husband should get a state pension forecast. If your husband doesn't know how much of a pension he may be entitled to at retirement, he should get his own state pension forecast.

SAVVY TIP: If you claim on your husband's National Insurance record it won't affect the pension he receives in any way.

• If you're claiming on your husband's NI record, he must have reached state pension age and has to be drawing his pension before you can receive yours.

SAVVY TIP: From April 6th 2010 the rules changed so that your husband won't have to have started claiming his state pension for you to use his NI record to claim yours, however he does have to have reached state pension age.

State pension and divorce
The rules around claiming your state pension on your ex husband's National Insurance record aren't complicated, so it's worth understanding exactly how they work. It's also worth knowing that women and men can claim on their ex's National Insurance record already.

• If you claim using your ex husband's National Insurance, it can be calculated either for the tax years up to the tax year in which the marriage ended or the whole of your ex husband's record up to the date of divorce (whichever gives you the bigger pension).

SAVVY TIP: You can only use your ex husband's National Insurance record if you don't remarry before you reach state pension age.

• Your ex husband doesn't have to be told. If you're using his NI record to claim your pension, he doesn't have to know about it. All you need to provide is his National Insurance number.

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Related articles:

How to retire comfortably

Approaching retirement; how to prepare

What to do with your tax-free pension lump sum

SAVVY HELP: Tony Attubato of the Pensions Advisory Service is one of SavvyWoman's panel of experts. You can ask Tony a question about any state pension issue by clicking here. The answer will be displayed on the website but your surname will never be used.

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Posted by Gillian dated 2010-03-30 09:53:34
My husband died in February 2009 aged 61 years,having worked full time from the age of 15 paying full NI at all times. I started receiving a pesnion in February 2007 on reaching 60 on my own contributions, having worked full time from the age of 15 without any break, unfortunately for some years I did only pay the married womens stamp rate. From April I will receive Basic State Pension of £68.36 plus Graduated of £1.50 Total per week £69.86. I am self employed and still working. Can I increase my pension using my late husbands contributions?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2010-03-30 12:45:57
Hi Gillian, Thanks for your comment. Unfortunately, I don't think that claiming on your late husband's NI contributions record will help you as the maximum state pension you can claim this way is 60% of his (which would work out at £57.05 a week). As you're already receiving more than that, you wouldn't be better off claiming on your late husband's NI record.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2010-10-30 08:53:47
Hi Grace, Thanks for your question. Now your husband has reached state pension age you can claim a state pension based on his National Insurance contributions record. It will be worth approximately 60% of his basic state pension. Contact the Pension Service. Contact the Pension Service on 0800 7317898 and give them details of your husband's NI number etc and they should be able to sort it out.
Posted by Joan M dated 2010-12-15 18:27:00
Your savvy tip states from 6th April 2010 I could collect 60% of my husbands pension even if he hasn't started claiming his State Pension. My husband will be 65 in December 2011 and will start his State Pension. The pension people say I can not claim my 60% untill he is 65.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2010-12-18 18:06:33
Hi Joan, Thanks for your comment. The savvy tip you referred to refers to the previous comment where it says that your husband would have had to have been reached state pension age AND be claiming his state pension in order for you to claim 60% of his pension. The rules changed in April so that now you can claim 60% of his state pension and he does not have to have started claiming his pension, although he does have to have reached state pension age. I realise that the way I worded the savvy tip was somewhat ambiguous so I'll rewrite it. The change was designed to help women whose husband had reached state pension age but who had deferred their state pension. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-01-13 07:14:07
Hi 'poor old lady', thanks for your question. I wanted to double check the answer will Tony Attubato from the Pensions Advisory Service who's SavvyWoman's state pensions expert. I've not yet had a reply from him but I'll post an answer as soon as I receive one. Hopefully it will be in the next day or so.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-01-13 11:34:14
Hi again 'poor old lady', I've heard from Tony Attubato who says this: As you have already reached state pension age, aside from your decision to defer claiming your state pension, there is nothing preventing you from drawing your pension. When it is calculated, your former husband’s NI contribution record, for the tax years up to the tax year your marriage ended can be used instead of your own if you'd get a larger pension that way - as long as you have not remarried before your own state pension age. When you come to claim your state pension, you should be asked for some details about your former husband and when you divorced. The Pension Service (who calculate and pay your state pension) should do the rest.
Posted by Lucy dated 2011-01-29 21:47:25
Hi Tony. I am 59 and have, in the UK, now approx 19 years of state pension...from 1975-79 I worked in France and from 1989-1991 wasn't working (3 babies) and then moved to Brussels where I worked on and off until 2008. On returning here end 2008 I paid lump sum (about £3k) to pay some outstanding contributions. I am now freelance and paying NI. My husband works abroad and I think has 30 years UK pension as he paid a lump sum too. Do I need to pay the additional 10 years so as to get full UK state pension or could I claim on his. We, presumably, will be getting a state pension in Belgium too? Complicated isn't it?!
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-01-30 09:51:43
Hi Lucy, Thanks for your question. I've sent it to Tony Attubato and I'll add the answer here once I receive it. Are you including the three years when you weren't working as time when you would be credited with NI contributions (which you would have been - effectively - if you were receiving child benefit)? Also, have you been working on a freelance basis since 2008? Any additional information is useful. Thanks again for your comment. Sarah
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-01-31 19:08:46
Hi Lucy, I've received the answer from Tony Attubato. It's a bit too long to include in this comment box so I've turned it into an 'ask the experts' answer. You can find it by checking answers in this section: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c0-pages/asktheexpert-read.php
I hope it's helpful to you.
Posted by Poor old lady dated 2011-02-11 23:28:55
Have you received an answer to my question yet please
Posted by poor lady dated 2011-02-11 23:40:37
Have now found the answer after scrolling down further. Sorry but thanks for your help.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-02-14 20:05:01
Hi poor old lady,
I'm glad you found the answer. This article has generated quite a large number of comments so your reply became a bit hidden. I hope it's useful to you. If you need any further information, leave another comment or email me directly at sarah[at]savvywoman.co.uk.
Posted by Idiot dated 2011-02-26 17:05:09
I opted to pay a married women's stamp when I was 18. When I had children and wasn't working would this period still be calculated under "married women's contribution".
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-02-28 07:58:15
Hi 'idiot' - thanks for your comment. The married women's stamp was something many women opted for (and some believed they had no choice over) when they got married. Only as they near retirement does it become clear how much they've lost out by doing this. Under the rules you can't get home responsibilities protection (which essentially reduced the number of years you had to pay NI for to get a full state pension) for any tax year that you elected to pay the married women's stamp in. Have you found out how much state pension you might be entitled to by getting a state pension forecast? If you have any more detailed questions, please either email me at sarah[at]savvywoman.co.uk or put a question to the state pensions expert via the 'ask the experts' section. Sorry not to have better news for you.
Posted by redinch dated 2011-03-10 09:07:27
My husband will reach 65 in December 2011 & has the full 30 years reqd to claim BSP. I reached 60 in August 2007 & receive a reduced BSP of £32.90 per week due to lack of NI conts. Will I be able to claim 60% of the BSP once my husband is 65 as I was born before 6/4/1950
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-03-13 13:19:04
Hi Redinch, Thanks for your comment. I'll double check this but my understanding is that you would be able to claim a state pension worth 60% of your husband's as soon as he reaches state pension age. I'll check it on Monday and update the comment if my understanding is wrong.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-04-16 08:41:56
Hi Karen, Thanks for your question -it's a very good one. I'll have to check with the Pensions Advisory Service, but I can't see any reason why both can't make a claim on the husband/ex husband's NI record. Whenever someone claims a state pension on someone else's NI record, it doesn't affect the pension that person receives, so - in theory at least - more than one person can claim against another's NI record. I'll check this and change the comment if I'm wrong.
Posted by Stupid dated 2011-04-18 14:09:36
How do I find out when I changed from married womans stamp to full stamp?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-04-20 07:46:39
Hi erm stupid, and thanks for your question. I'd have thought the best way to find out when you started paying full National Insurance is to ask for a state pension forecast. You can do this online or by telephone and you can find information on how to do this in the article above (paragraph 4). If you still don't get an answer, I'd suggest you submit a question to Tony Attubato who is SavvyWoman's state pensions expert (via the 'ask the expert' button on the left hand side of the screen). I hope this helps.
Posted by puzzled pensioner dated 2011-05-07 17:13:39
can you tell me how often a married woman could elect to pay the reduced rate stamp? I have been told I elected in 1965/67 then revoked it and paid the full rate N.I until I elected again in 1974/81 I always understood you could elect once only.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-05-08 23:34:02
Hi puzzled pensioner. Thanks for your question. I'm afraid I don't know the answer to this one but I'll send your question to Tony Attubato from the Pensions Advisory Service and will update the comments section when I get a reply from him.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-05-10 10:59:59
Hi puzzled pensioner, I've had a reply from Tony Attubato at the Pensions Service who has this to say: It’s my understanding that before April 1975 a married woman could change whether she paid the married women's stamp or full NI at anytime. Legislation changed from 1975 but I believe that there was a transitional period up to May 1977 in which it was still possible to elect to pay the reduced rate. After May ’77 no new elections could be made, although it was possible to carry on paying reduced rate if you had chosen to do so before.

I hope that helps.
Posted by Helpful bro dated 2011-07-02 10:14:17
My brother in law died recently aged 62. He has worked in the UK all his adult life paying NICs. My sister in law (his wife) is 61 and in receipt of a state retirement pension. It is reduced becasue she deos not have a full NIC record, but it is higher than 60% of the full pension. I have heard that now she is a widow, her pension will increase to the full level. Is this correct?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-07-09 07:22:03
Hi Helpful Bro, You're right that your sister is able to claim the basic state pension that her husband (your brother in law) was entitled to at the time of his death, based on his National Insurance record. The maximum she would be able to receive is the full basic state pension, which is currently £102.15 a week. She should contact the Pension Centre on 0845 3013 011. Come back if you have any other queries.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-07-17 11:07:36
Hi Helpful Bro, in case you missed my comment, it managed to bury itself halfway through the comments column. I'm hoping this one will appear at the bottom of the list of comments...
Posted by mums the word dated 2011-07-18 10:09:53
Did a married woman paying the reduced rate stamp also pay graduated pension between April 1961 - April 1975
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-07-20 08:47:16
Hi Mums the word. Women who paid the married women's stamp gave up their right to a state pension based on their own National Insurance contributions for those years. However, you may have made contributions for a graduated retirement benefit or graduated pension before you started paying the married women's stamp.
Posted by maire dated 2011-11-11 12:19:44
Idont qualify for a pension no stanps,divorsed in 1990,could i claim on my ex husband stamps,and i dont know his social no.Bitter divorse so cant ask.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2011-11-17 11:33:37
Hi Maire,
Thanks for your comment and apologies for not spotting it sooner. If you've not got a full or good National Insurance contributions record you can claim a pension worth up to 60% of the full basic state pension, using your husband or ex husband's NI record instead. You can only use his record for the years you were married, as long as you don't remarry before you reach state pension age. It helps if you knew your ex's NI number, but the Pension Service should be able to help you out, even if you don't. Ring the Pension Service (there's a different number depending on whereabouts you live) to find out more.
Posted by MOLLY dated 2012-01-07 16:59:14
WHEN i REACHED 60 I GOT PENSION FROM MY STAMP i AM NOW 78 ONLY GETTING £53 A WEEK SHOULD i HAVE MORE CLAIMING ON MY HUSBAND STAMP HE IS 79
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-01-08 11:35:19
Hi Molly,
Thanks for your question. Under the rules, you're entitled to claim what's called a 'category B' state pension (which is a pension based on your husband's National Insurance record. It's worth up to 60% of the full basic state pension. That would be a maximum of just over £61 in the current tax year. I'd contact the Pension Service on 0800 731 7898 and see what they say. You'll need your National Insurance number.
Posted by lynsky21 dated 2012-02-24 16:51:03
can i claim anything from my partners national insurance we have been together 30 yrs
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-02-25 10:43:59
Hi Lynsky21,
Thanks for your question. I'm afraid to say that you can only claim a state pension from your husband or civil partner's contributions, you can't claim a state pension on their contributions if you're not married.
Posted by Lynda dated 2012-04-04 13:42:00
My husband died in 2003 aged 55, I was 53 when he died. I am now receiving my state pension of £125.00 per week. Am I entitled to any of my late husband's pension. Thank you
Posted by Marie dated 2012-04-14 19:53:11
Could you please help me? I am wondering if it is possible to claim benefits - I am currently on ESA (Contribution based) - as I am likely to lose them under the Governments recent revisions, based on my husband's NI contributions. Thank you
Posted by shaung dated 2012-04-27 17:41:42
My wife is 70 and never claimed her 60% of my full state pension,now they have payed her some money less tax will she have to pay anything back for pension credit or will it only be from now on s a pension is now being payed (change of circunstances)
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-05-01 22:31:45
Hi Shaung,
Thanks for your question. Would you mind submitting the question via the 'ask the expert' section as I think it would be one for Tony Attubato, the state and company pensions expert, to answer? If you're able to give any more detail about why your wife is now receiving the payment, that would be very useful.

The 'ask the expert' section can be found via the grey navigation tab on the left hand side of each web page.
Posted by having it tough. dated 2012-05-02 15:43:55
Got divorced ,and re married to someone who had no pension,has now died and i have only nine years stamps, can i get help with ex husbands stamps,for to get any pension,am 68.Thank you.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-05-17 09:22:29
Hi Having it tough,
Thanks for your comment. I did leave a reply but for some reason it didn't 'stick'. Anyway, you may be able to increase your state pension based on your ex husband's NI contributions. I'd recommend that you ring the Pensions Service and tell them about your situation. Without knowing exactly how much you already get, it's difficult to give you a more specific answer.

You wouldn't be able to claim a state pension on your late husband's contributions if he died before you reached state pension age.
Posted by percysnail dated 2012-06-06 15:43:54
When my husband gets his state pension in 2 years time will he be able to claim for a married person's pension I will be 60 when he claims his state pension
Posted by Dopey dated 2012-06-07 18:22:28
I started to pay married women's stamp when I married, aged 18. Does this mean that the time I had off work to bring my children up is also counted as women's stamp contributions? I did change my contributions later in life - my pension is £42 per week. Thanks.
Posted by annie dated 2012-06-14 12:25:39
hi im getting a state pension and invalidity money. my partner would like to move in with me and take care of me would it affect my money if he does
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-16 13:05:04
Hi Percysnail,
Thanks for your question. The rules say that you are each entitled to a state pension in your own right, as long as you've paid enough National Insurance contributions (or been credited with NI contributions).

If you've not paid enough NI contributions you're entitled to claim a pension of 60% of the full basic state pension, based on your husband's contributions. If you're entitled to more in your own right, you obviously wouldn't get it.

For you to get the 60% pension your husband would have to have reached state pension age although he would not have to have taken his pension. You would also have to reach state pension age to receive it.

I hope that's helpful.
Posted by Pauline dated 2012-06-18 06:32:52
I receive a small state pension which includes some of my ex husband's pension contributions. I am now 66 years old. If I remarried would my pension be reduced.
Posted by Trixie dated 2012-06-20 19:11:22
My husband is 80. I am 62. We have lived in S. Ireland for 20 years.My husband receives a British state pension of £100. I have not claimed a pension as I am sure I have few credits. However, I understand that he should have put a claim in for myself since I turned 60. If so, could he put in for a lump sum, backdated? Also, could I defer payment. And, if i do so, what happens if he dies before I have claimed. Would that render my lump sum null and void? Yours, Trixie.
Posted by dated 2012-06-20 19:12:42
My husband is 80. I am 62. We have lived in S. Ireland for 20 years.My husband receives a British state pension of £100. I have not claimed a pension as I am sure I have few credits. However, I understand that he should have put a claim in for myself since I turned 60. If so, could he put in for a lump sum, backdated? Also, could I defer payment. And, if i do so, what happens if he dies before I have claimed. Would that render my lump sum null and void? Yours, Trixie.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-25 08:52:23
Hi Trixie,
Thanks for your question. I'm not entirely clear on the answer to your question, but my understanding is that you may have been able to claim a state pension based on your husband's NI contributions (it's called a 'category B' pension). I'd suggest that you ring the Pension Service and find out how you go about claiming it. You can find the contact numbers by copying and pasting this link: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Pensionsandretirementplanning/StatePension/DG_183111 You should be able to get it backdated but only - I think - for up to 12 months (or four months if someone claims an increase for a dependant).

You can defer your category B pension. I'd suggest that you ask the Pension Service (whose number is on the link above) about the specific questions around what happens if your husband were to die before your pension is paid.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-25 09:30:27
Hi Pauline,
Thanks for your question. You won't lose any of the state pension you're claiming on your former husband's National Insurance record if you were to remarry. You would only have lost it if you'd remarried before you reached state pension age. I hope that helps.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-25 09:34:29
Hi Dopey,
Thanks for your question and sorry I didn't answer it first time round. I'm afraid that you don't qualify for 'home responsibilities protection' (as it used to be called) while you were paying the married women's stamp. The only way you may be able to get a higher state pension is by claiming on your husband or ex husband's National Insurance record. That could give you a pension worth up to 60% of his (called a 'category B' pension). It works out at around £64 a week.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-25 09:40:16
Hi Annie
Thanks for your comment. Your partner moving in with you wouldn't affect your state pension. Without knowing more about the invalidity money you get, I'm not sure whether or not it would be affected. My understanding is that incapacity benefit payments aren't affected by a partner moving in, but I'd suggest that you contact a welfare rights agency or the Department for Work and Pensions.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-06-25 09:44:30
Hi Annie
Thanks for your comment. Your partner moving in with you wouldn't affect your state pension. Without knowing more about the invalidity money you get, I'm not sure whether or not it would be affected. My understanding is that incapacity benefit payments aren't affected by a partner moving in, but I'd suggest that you contact a welfare rights agency or the Department for Work and Pensions.
Posted by MC dated 2012-06-29 03:04:19
Hi

If a husband has 25 out of 30 years of contributions and a wife has 15 out of 30 years of contributions are they able to claim on each other's contributions and therefore be entitled to a full pension (based on adding up to an extra 60% of the other's pension)? Or would the maximum amount they receive by based on the individual years? Thanks
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-07-08 12:43:58
Hi MC,
Thanks for your question and sorry for the delay in replying. I'm not sure I've understood your question clearly but hope the answer will be useful. You would be able to claim a pension worth 60% of your husband's if your state pension would be worth less based on your own NI record.

That would mean your husband would get the pension he's earned in his own right (based on 25 years of NI) and you could claim one worth 60% of that.

I can't see the benefit of your husband claiming on your NI record as he has paid more National Insurance than you...

I hope this helps.
Posted by A C dated 2012-07-10 16:47:31
My pension started last month T £61.00 . My husband died in 1990 would I be entitled to any more money from his contributions . He was 40 when he died. I have also lost his national insurance no.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2012-07-24 10:02:04
Hi AC,
Thanks for your question. In broad terms, you can claim a basic state pension based on your late husband's NI record, if you're not entitled to the full basic state pension yourself. However, as he was 40 when he died, I don't know how much of a National Insurance record he built up while he was working.

If he was entitled to a graduated state pension or SERPS (state earnings related state pension) you might be able to inherit some of that.

I'd suggest you call the National Insurance Registration line 0845 915 7006 to get your late husband's National Insurance number and ring the Pension Service to see if they think you're entitled to a pension based on his record.

If you don't get anywhere with them, try the Pensions Advisory Service on 0845 601 2923 - it's a free to use and independent advice service.
Posted by lidiahenshaw@yahoo.co.uk dated 2012-08-13 23:29:02
my husband in his state pension receiving money for dependant/myself/ when i will received my own pension will he still getting money for me?
Posted by nina dated 2012-11-06 16:31:36
My parents stay separately.My father worked in Birmingham from 1959-71 and gets pension from the British government They live in India and my mother reached 60 this year. My mother received a form asking whether she would like to recieve a part of the pension. Does she need the consent of my father? Does he have to write to the government regarding the pension
Posted by miss sparkle dated 2012-12-07 14:15:21
is it true that I can still claim a widows pension even though I was devorced from him??
Posted by Mrs Getting Ready dated 2012-12-08 06:11:36
Hi, I am interested in all the readings on your pages. Allthough still many year to go for us to receive our pensions its good to know and plan ahead. My husband had made 40 years of contributions, he is 61 in January 2013, I have made 23 years of contributions and am 57 years old. My calculated age when I should receive my State Pension is 66 years. Based on my husbands contributions and my age when he reaches 65 would I qualify for a 60% pension then. We both no longer work, my Husband receives a private pension.
This I hope when answered may help me and many other in the same situation.
Posted by lbow dated 2012-12-17 01:32:06
please can you tell me how many years can you deferr your pension for.I understand you gain a10% interest.I am still able to work and need to save my pension until i am out of work.
Posted by Ann dated 2012-12-27 16:08:22
I started work at 15, but the online calculator asks how many yers contributions from age 19, what happened to the 1st 4 years
Posted by MO dated 2013-01-07 14:40:39
CAN I CLAIM ANY OF MY DECEASED HUSBANDS RETIREMENT PENSION.MY HUSBAND DIED 2 WEEKS AFTER HIS 65TH BIRTHDAY. I AM ALREADY RECEIVING MY OWN FULL BASIC PENSION.
Posted by cherich dated 2013-01-08 20:13:35
We married 8 years ago. I have never worked, am disabled per the USA. Can I collect anythingat age 62 even though he is younger?
Posted by winterstoke dated 2013-01-14 17:10:02
I am to receive my State Pension on the 6th November 2013 when I shall be 61 and 10 months old. My husband worked all his life and was an OAP and receiving his OAP when he was 65 in 1998. He died in 2004 but I was only 52 then, can I claim any of his pension to add to mine, I have 33 years of NI including when I was bringing up our children?
Posted by Hard worker dated 2013-01-20 09:23:14
Can anyone tell me if I am entitled to a pension in my own right? I am married but have worked for 35 years and retired from my job at 55 I have to wait till I am 66 for my pension and am not planning on getting another job until then. I have paid my own contributions but will we still end up with a married couples allowance which is less than if we had our own pension, or do I lose out again
Posted by steve dated 2013-01-20 15:38:51
can you draw a reduced state pension before the age of 65
Posted by Mandy dated 2013-02-14 17:22:05
I am 54 and have contributions for at least 30yrs (they don't tell you exactly how many years). Under proposed rules I won't receive my pension till I'm 66. My husband retires in 3 yrs aged 65. He has been self employed all his working life. We have been married for 16yrs. If I haven't got 35yrs contributions (as proposed), can I use his from the years before we married (when I was a student?) to add to mine?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-14 18:07:28
Hi Steve, Thanks for your comment and sorry for the delay in replying to you. You cannot receive a state pension before you reach state pension age. You can defer taking your state pension, but you cannot take it earlier than state pension age.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-14 18:09:47
Hi Hard Worker, Thanks for your comment and sorry for the delay in replying. You will receive a state pension in your own right if you have paid enough National Insurance contributions. If you reach state pension age before the flat rate state pension is introduced, you will need to have paid National Insurance for 30 years (or been credited with them, if you were bringing up children, for example). I hope that helps.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 07:45:38
Hi Nina, Thank you for your comment and apologies for the lengthy delay in replying. We've had some major problems with the spam catching software for the comments section. In answer to your question, your dad doesn't have to give permission for your mum to claim a state pension based on his National Insurance contributions. In fact, he doesn't even have to know about it as it won't affect the pension he receives. She may not receive a full basic state pension as it will depend on how long they were married for
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 07:47:20
Hi Mandy, Thanks for your question. I'm afraid that if you reach state pension age after the flat rate state pension has been introduced (in April 2017 - as current plans stand) you will not be able to use your husband's contribution record. This 'right' will be abolished when the flat rate pension is introduced.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 07:57:04
Hi Mrs Getting Ready, Thank you for your comment and apologies for the delay in replying. We've had some problems with the comments system that meant I couldn't post replies. Onto your question... if you are currently 57, you are likely to receive your state pension after the new flat rate state pension is introduced. The planned rules say that from then you will not be able to claim a state pension based on your husband's National Insurance contributions. However, you would be able to claim a state pension based on his NI up to the date the flat rate pension is implemented. If you have not reached state pension age on the date it is implemented, you would not be able to use your husband's record for those months/years from the date the flat rate pension is introduced until you reach state pension age. I hope that helps.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 08:01:46
Hi lbow, Thanks for your comment and apologies for the lengthy delay in replying. We've had some major problems with the spam catching software on the comments section. In terms of your question, there is no limit on how long you can defer taking your state pension for. You earn an extra 10.4% for every year that you defer it, but you will have lost a year's worth of pension, so the trade off is not as attractive as it might appear. There is more information in my article on this, which you can find by typing 'defer' into the keyword search bar on SavvyWoman.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 08:29:03
Hi Cherich, Thanks for your question and apologies for the delay in replying. I'd need to know a little more about your situation to be able to give you an answer. Do you still live in the USA? If you can give me more information, I'll try to give you an answer.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 08:31:51
Hi Anne, Thanks for your comment and apologies for the delay in replying. I assume you are referring to the Gov.uk state pension calculator? I'm not quite sure why it does that. I'll see if I can find out and update the comments section.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-15 08:34:29
Hi Mo, Thanks for your question and apologies for the delay in replying. We've been having problems with the spam catching software, which meant I couldn't post replies. You should be entitled to receive some of your late husband's additional pension (SERPS, graduated pension and/or the state second pension) if he contributed to this while he was working. There's an article in this section called 'what happens to the state pension when you die' which explains what someone might receive.
Posted by Jennie dated 2013-02-19 20:24:40
I receive £86.77 per week state pension. When my husband qualifies next year for his full state pension do I still receive my allowance or automatically change to a married couples allowance
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-02-19 22:35:40
Hi Jennie, Thanks for your question. You obviously receive your £86 or so state pension based on your own National Insurance contributions, so when your husband gets his state pension, you will continue to receive the same amount. The 'married couples pension' is a slightly misleading term as it's the amount couples get if the wife (and it is normally the wife) isn't entitled to a full basic state pension based on her own contributions, but instead claims a state pension of 60% of the full amount based on her husband's National Insurance record. I hope that helps.
Posted by HIM dated 2013-02-20 22:40:06
I divorced and remarried in 2002. My new wife has never worked and only lived in the UK since 1999 but is a british citizen and has an N I number. I understand that she may be able to claim 60 percent of my basic state pension. Would she be able to claim a full 60 percent?
Posted by shirley dated 2013-02-24 13:46:35
Hi, I hold acertificate of reduced liability to pay national insurance I have been self employed since 1974 and still hold the certificate my husband gets his pension December 2013 I was born 1954 I was told I could have a pension from his contributions The question is How much if any and when Thank you Shirley
Posted by Shirley Hoskin dated 2013-02-24 13:48:07
Hi, I hold acertificate of reduced liability to pay national insurance I have been self employed since 1974 and still hold the certificate my husband gets his pension December 2013 I was born 1954 I was told I could have a pension from his contributions The question is How much if any and when Thank you Shirley
Posted by James dated 2013-03-07 22:13:54
My wife has never worked. We made the decision she would be a full time Mum and I would work all the hours I can. She has never paid NI. Is she entitled to a state pension?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-07 23:02:14
Hi James, Thanks for your question. There isn't a watertight answer...but your wife will be entitled to a state pension of some sort, although it may be considerably less than the full state pension. Basically, depending on when your wife had children, she will have either received Home Responsibilities Protection or - since 2010 - National Insurance credits. The rules for each are slightly different. With NI credits, you only get credits while you're registered for child benefit (even if you opt out afterwards because one of you earns £50,000 a year or more) until your youngest child is 12. HRP worked in a slightly different way and reduced the number of years you needed to pay NI for in order to qualify for a full basic state pension. I'd suggest your wife tries to get a state pension statement. This article describes how to do it: http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=879
Posted by pollyanna589000 dated 2013-03-12 14:23:14
Hello the question is will I be able to get a claim on my ex husbands pension, if he left me in 1978 and we divorced in 1981. Also when I became 60 years of age, I claimed my state pension he was not 60 but 59 at the time. The pension service says they checked this already, but another department said check with them again. Please tell me what advice can you give me? Should I have made another claim when my ex husband did become retiring age?
Posted by Lena dated 2013-03-12 16:46:32
I'll be able to receive the State Pension from May 2013, which, given my NI contributions, will be 40% of the full value. I know about claiming 60% based on my husband's contributions, but he only reaches 65 in Oct 2017. So, my questions are: 1) can I receive the SP at 40% until 2017 and then claim more? 2) will I be still able to do so considering the new pension rules? 3) assuming the answers to 1 and 2 are affirmative, what happens to any increase in pension that I may get if I defer (i.e. is there any point in deferring at all)?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-13 17:05:37
Hi Pollyanna, Thanks for your question. In general terms, you may well be able to claim a pension based on your ex-husband's NI record, either for the years that you were married or for his working life. Before 2010 you couldn't claim a state pension based on his record until your ex husband had started claiming his, but the rules changed so he only had to have reached state pension age in order for you to claim (ie it didn't matter if he'd decided to defer taking his state pension). I would definitely contact the Pensions Service again, or, if you'd like some advice, speak to the Pensions Advisory Service, which is a free to use information service. You can call them on 0845 600 0806 during office hours. Their website address is here: http://www.pensionsadvisoryservice.org.uk/home.aspx
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-13 17:34:10
Hi Lena, Thanks for your question. I can answer the first two, but as to deferral of your state pension - that's a personal decision. As things stand, you will receive the pension you are entitled to based on your own National Insurance history, when you reach state pension age. When your husband reaches his state pension age, you can get a pension worth up to 60% of the full rate. However, as the flat rate state pension is due to be introduced in April 2017, my understanding is that what the government is likely to do is to value your state pension entitlement on 6th April, based on your husband's NI contributions and not give you any further entitlement, even if your husband continues to pay NI between April and when he reaches state pension age. This is all currently at the planning stage, so it could change before it becomes law....
Posted by Stephanie carter dated 2013-03-14 12:59:11
I have my decree absolute and want to claim state pension in line with my husbands NI record. (I am 48 years old) How do I go about claiming? Is there a special form to fill in or if I should write, which address should I use? HELP...Please!
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-15 09:13:01
Hi Stephanie, Thanks for your question. You won't be able to claim a state pension based on your ex husband's National Insurance record until you reach state pension age (obviously!). The government is planning to change the rules when it introduces the flat rate state pension in April 2017 (assuming its plans go through). After that date, women - and men - won't be able to claim on their ex husband/wife/civil partner's record. What I'd suggest is that you ring the Pension Service now and see what they say. My understanding is that the Department for Work and Pensions will effectively carry out a valuation of NI you have been credited with from your ex-husband, in April 2017. You can only use your ex husband's record if it will give you a bigger basic state pension than the one you would be entitled to in your own right. My article on claiming your state pension (which you can read by copying this link: http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=67 ) includes all the contac
Posted by Barbara dated 2013-03-21 15:05:44
My husband claimed his state pension in 2006 at the age of 67 I have just requested to receive my pension based on my husbands national insurance contributions I was eligible to receive this at 60 I am now 67 I thought I could receive a lump sum for the 7 years I have not claimed receiving different advice from the pension office was told under the new law i cannot claim before 2010 so only 3 years lump sum . My husband put off claiming for a year does that make any difference otherwise I have lost 4 years back payment . They never told my husband I should claim as I would have done this straight away rather than lose thousands of back dated pension . Is there anything else I should claim .
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-21 15:43:15
Hi Barbara, Thanks for your question. I think your best bet might be to contact the Pensions Advisory Service - which is a free to use information service - with your question. I have a feeling that what you've been told is correct, but I may be wrong about this. You can contact the Pensions Advisory Service during office hours on 0845 600 0806 (it's a special pensions helpline for women). Let me know how you get on. If you don't get anywhere, do please leave another comment and I'll look into it for you.
Posted by JR dated 2013-03-27 01:29:12
I have filed for divorce, I paid reduced stamp. My husband is 66 and is receiving a full married allowance of £680 every 4 weeks. Will I be able to claim 60% of that sum, or 60% of a single pension. We have been married 47 years.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-03-29 10:19:53
Hi JR, Thanks for your question. The 60% sum refers to 60% of the full basic state pension (which is currently around £107 a week). However, there are two ways you may be able to increase the amount you receive. The first is that you can substitute your ex husband's NI record for your own during the years you were married, which may give you more than 60%. Secondly, if your husband receives the state second pension, SERPS, the graduated pension (or any private or public sector pension), you can put in a claim for a percentage of it. It may be that these pensions are divided or that the value is 'offset' against other assets, such as the family home.
Posted by confused Sue dated 2013-04-08 14:15:21
I receive 37.34 state pension plus 12.72 Post 97 (?)additional state pension a month. Would I be better off claiming on my husband's pension, he receives a full pension but we have been separated for 28 years?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-04-11 06:35:11
Hi Confused Sue, Thanks for your comment and sorry I missed it until today. I would suggest that you ring the Pensions Service and ask them if you would be better off claiming under your ex husband's NI record. You would need his National Insurance number, and I don't know if that's something you have access to. You can call them on 08456 060 265. If you don't get much joy from them, ring the Pensions Advisory Service, which is a free to use service (and they really know their stuff when it comes to pensions). They are on 0845 600 0806. Good luck.
Posted by jackie l dated 2013-04-11 21:52:23
My es husband is 6 years younger than i am can I still claim pension from his ni
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-04-12 10:44:22
Hi Jackie Thanks for your comment. You can claim a state pension based on your ex husband's contributions, but you can only do so once he has reached state pension age (although he doesn't have to claim his state pension at that point). If he defers his pension, you're still able to claim as long as he has reached state pension age (currently 65 for men).
Posted by josaline dated 2013-04-23 12:13:07
hi how do i get phone number or address to request a application form to claim on my husbands national insurance numberwho has 50 years of paying N/i contributions I was born on 16/01/1954 can tou please point me in the right direction thnk you
Posted by manju dated 2013-04-29 09:32:54
Ihave done volunary class3 contribution ttill may 2015 when ishould retire for state pension can istll claim my husband s state pension contribution or have i have lost out by contribution.my husband is alredy gettig state pension not fully baic because less no nic years.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-04-29 12:01:03
Hi Josaline, Thank you for your comment and apologies for the delay in replying but I was on holiday for a few days and the wifi connection wasn't as good as I'd hoped. You should get in touch with the Pensions Service. There are details of how to contact them here: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service If you are contacting them about your state pension for the first time, you should ring 0800 731 7898, and if it's to report a change in circumstances, you should ring 08456 060 265. I hope that helps.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-03 08:27:38
Hi Manju, Thanks for your question and sorry for the delay in replying. Without a bit more detail I can't give you a full answer, but you would be able to claim a state pension worth up to 60% of the full basic state pension, based on your husband's National Insurance contributions. If you would be entitled to receive more than this based on the number of years of National Insurance you have paid, you wouldn't get anything extra through your husband's NI contributions. If I were you I would try and get hold of a state pension statement to see what you might be entitled to receive. I've written an article explaining how to get hold of your state pensions statement, elsewhere in this section.
Posted by jemma dated 2013-05-04 14:35:21
I have been divorced from my husband since 1983 but weve been back together for 20 years without re marrying. we are both 60 and would like to get married but worry we could lose out by getting less pensions than if we are claiming as single people,
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-05 12:19:23
Hi Jemma, Thanks for your question. I'd recommend that you get hold of a state pension statement, which will tell you how much state pension you've earned so far from your National Insurance contributions. There is no such thing as a 'married couple's pension' in strict terms. If you each qualify for a full basic state pension based on your own NI contributions, you will each receive the full amount (currently £110.15 a week). However, as a divorced woman you could substitute your ex-husband's NI record for your own, either for the years you were married or the whole of your ex-husband's NI record up to the date of divorce. If you claim using your ex husband's record in this way, you would lose this state pension if you were to remarry before you reach state pension age. Your situation is quite unusual and I don't know that the Pension Service would have a problem with the fact you are claiming on your ex husband's NI record while living at the same address as him (assuming you are).
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-05 12:20:02
Your situation is quite unusual and I don't know that the Pension Service would have a problem with the fact you Answer for Jemma - part 2 It might be worth giving the Pensions Advisory Service a call to check this out. It's not part of the government but it's a free to use pensions information service. You can call them on 0845 601 2923.
Posted by Sue dated 2013-05-06 13:37:55
I am a widow, over pension age but continuing to work until at least age 65 (in 2014). I have an inadequate record of NI contributions in my own right, having worked off and on on short term contracts and part-time (usually paid below the NI threshold) until about 10 years ago. My husband died before he reached pension age. Am I right in thinking, in view of the bill about to be introduced in Parliament, that I may be able to claim a state pension under my husband's NI contributions, but only as long as I claim it before 2016?
Posted by SuzyWong dated 2013-05-06 17:52:09
I was 60 in march. My husband already receives State Pension. Can I claim a Cat B pension based on his contributions and when could I claim it?
Posted by liz dated 2013-05-06 17:55:12
My husband died in march 2010 and was getting state pension I was born in 1952 unable to get state pension until I am 62 I believe I am retired from health board through service was wondering am I entitled to claim anything from my late husbands contribution much obliged to you for your response Liz
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-07 07:20:45
Hi Sue, Thanks for your question. You're almost right, except that the crucial date is not when you take your state pension, but when you reach state pension age and are therefore entitled to claim it. Under the government's proposals, women who reach state pension age after April 6th 2016 would only be able to get a pension based on their husband's NI contributions if they had - at any point - paid the married women's NI stamp/reduced rate.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-07 07:28:25
Hi Suzy, Thanks for your question. I've just done a rough calculation, using the Pensions Advisory Service state pension age calculator, which you can access via SavvyWoman's budgeting tools (if you copy and paste this link: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c0-pages/budgetingtools.php). It says that you'll reach state pension age on 6th March 2016, which means you should be able to claim a category B pension then. I hope that's helpful.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-07 07:32:36
Hi Liz, Thanks for your question. I've written an article entitled 'what happens to your state pension when you die', which explains what you may be able to inherit. You can read the article by copying and pasting this link: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=819 . You may be able to use your late husband's National Insurance record instead of your own, if it's better than yours. However, you wouldn't be able to get your state pension until you reach state pension age. You may also be able to inherit part of his SERPs or state second pension, if applicable. I hope this helps.
Posted by Inquiring Mind dated 2013-05-11 09:53:54
Hi,I am from USA and married an englishman and moved here in 2006. I have been working since being here albeit some jobs have been temporary due to economy. My supervisor said I may be able to claim some pension income from my husband who is 69 and still working. I am 51. Is this true?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-12 07:41:52
Hi inquiring mind, Thanks for your question. Under the current rules, you would be able to claim a state pension based on your husband's National Insurance contributions which would be worth 60% of the full amount - but only when you reach state pension age. However, the government plans to introduce a flat rate state pension and that will mean that women will no longer be able to claim a pension based on their husband's contributions - unless they have paid the lower 'married women's stamp' (a reduced rate of National Insurance). This is due to affect all women who reach state pension age after April 2016, and so would affect you, if it becomes law.
Posted by Fisherking dated 2013-05-12 17:43:04
If my wife did not receive 60% of the state pension when I reached 65 (because we didn't know she was entitled to do so) can she claim back what she should have received? I receive a full state pension. We are both age 70.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-14 08:57:23
Hi Fisherking, Thanks for your comment. I'd advise you to ring the Pensions Service and explain what's happened (if you haven't already). The telephone number is 08456 060 265. My understanding is that the state pension claim can be backdated for 12 months. I don't know if it can be backdated any further. Good luck with your enquiry.
Posted by Roy dated 2013-05-19 05:00:02
Hi all l am male and have just retired aged 65, l get the full state pension and because l have visible savings of less than £8,000, pension credit pushes my state pension up to £605 a month , very important to check out your pension credit eligibility as is not just given you have to apply for it, if you don't ask you don't get.
Posted by Bill Erlam dated 2013-05-19 10:43:35
Am I right in assuming that the MINIMUM pension a married woman, whose husband has paid enough NI contributions to qualify for a full pension, should get is 60% of a full pension
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-20 11:44:43
Hi Roy, Thanks for your comment. You make a very good point. You're not automatically awarded Pension Credit and it could make a big difference to your income. Thanks for highlighting this.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-20 11:49:59
Hi Bill, Thanks for your question. You are broadly correct in that a woman who is married or in a civil partnership and whose husband/civil partner has paid the full NI (ie 30 years) will receive a category B pension worth 60% of that. She will only receive it once her husband/civil partner has reached state pension age, although he doesn't have to have started claiming his pension. If he's deferred it, she can still claim on his record. She also can't claim if she's divorced and has remarried before reaching state pension age (although a divorced woman may be able to claim more than 60%, depending on her ex husband's NI record).
Posted by mary dated 2013-05-28 22:53:44
my husband receives a full married pension but we have been separated for over 10 years I,m due my pension this year will his pension effect mine? thanks
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-05-30 17:14:49
Hi Mary, Thanks for your question. If you're due to receive less than 60% of the full basic state pension, you can use your husband's National Insurance record to increase your own. If you were divorced rather than separated, you would be able to substitute his NI record for the years you were married or for his working life until the date of divorce. I hope that helps.
Posted by JuneRose dated 2013-06-03 04:19:23
Will my ex husband still receive the married man's allowance once our divorce is absolute.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-06-04 07:16:17
Hi JuneRose, Thanks for your question. I've had a quick check on the HM Revenue and Customs website and it says that the married couples' allowance will be paid for the tax year in which the divorce happens. So, if you got divorced after April 6th this year, your husband will continue to receive the allowance until April 5th next year. Here's a link to the relevant answer if you want to read the information: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/incometax/married-allow.htm#2
Posted by Jasmine dated 2013-06-27 05:23:09
i am 64 year old Philippine lady and am getting married soon to an English man and he tells me that i will receive a 60% value of his pension and a lump sum from the age i was 60 years old. is this true please? with many thanks, Jasmine
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-06-27 07:38:02
Hi Jasmine, Thanks for your question. If your husband and you have both reached state pension age, you are entitled to receive a so-called 'category B' pension, which is worth up to 60% of the full amount, based on your husband's National Insurance contributions. You will not receive a lump sum (although he might receive one if he has deferred his pension). However, you will normally only be able to get your claim backdated for a year and, in your case, I think you will only be entitled to the state pension from the moment you marry your husband, so I don't think you would be able to claim from 60. I would check this with the Pensions Service, whose contact details you can find if you copy and paste this link: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service
Posted by netty dated 2013-07-04 15:02:15
my ex husband has just died he remarried but his 2nd wife died over a year ago can i make any claims on his pension he was retired and i am due to retire next year year we were married for almost 23 years and i remained at home looking after the children and also recieved what was then severe disablemet. thanking you jeanette pope
Posted by Sandra dated 2013-07-07 11:21:06
Extremely helpful advise will be getting divorced need all the advise available great website
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-07 13:15:06
Hi Sandra, I'm sorry to hear you're getting divorced but thanks for your comment and I'm really pleased to hear that you think SavvyWoman will be useful to you. There is an 'ask the expert' section, which already has a lot of questions on divorce, that have already been answered. Also, there is a section on divorce and breakup, which you may find useful. If you copy and paste this link, you will find it here: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c8-pages/c8s0.php?art_id=1019 . I have also written a book on divorce and finance which, if you email me your address (my email is sarah[at]savvywoman[dot]co[dot]uk I will send you a copy free of charge.
Posted by susie dated 2013-07-13 13:55:17
Hi my mother was born in 1949 she has never paid ni contributions . Is she entitled to any pension of my fathers contributions he is 65 in august and she is 63 thanks
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-15 06:46:45
Hi Susie, Thanks for your question. Your mother should be able to get a pension of 60% of your father's basic state pension, based on his National Insurance record. That pension will be paid when your father reaches state pension age (ie when he is 65). I would suggest that your mother or father contact the pension service and explain the situation. You can copy and paste this link to get the contact details of the Pension Service: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service
Posted by Ben dated 2013-07-15 16:45:48
l have worked 40 years. l have told have work another 9 years to claim till the age of 66. 37 years is the minimum before one can claim. can l claim know ?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-16 08:16:51
Hi Ben, Thanks for your question. I'm a little confused by the dates you've given me, but I hope I've understood your question correctly. You say you've already worked (and I assume, paid National Insurance or been credited with it) for 40 years. The problem is that if you already have enough National Insurance years for a full state pension, you still can't claim it until you reach state pension age, which is - I'm assuming - when you are 66. It's the state pension age that is crucial, not just how many years NI you have paid. If you reach state pension age before April 2016, you will need 30 years of NI and if it is after April 6th 2016 you will need 35 years of NI. I hope that helps.
Posted by Shirley dated 2013-07-16 12:33:32
Where can you locate the National INSURANCE Number
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-17 13:33:48
Hi Shirley, Thanks for your question. There is information on how to find your National Insurance number if you copy and paste this link: https://www.gov.uk/lost-national-insurance-number
Posted by Ann dated 2013-07-19 11:19:10
Sounds good but is it feasible to get a divorce solely to claim full state pention, when all a persons married life (40 years) they have paid married woman's contributions?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-21 08:45:56
Hi Ann, Thanks for your question. I'm sure you could get divorced to increase your state pension, but, unless you and your husband could agree how to divide everything amicably, there could be considerable extra costs. I don't know if your situation is that you're separated and just want to formalise things with a divorce or if you and your husband are still together. If it's the former you would be able to benefit from a higher state pension, but there would be costs of at least several hundred pounds for court papers etc, even if you didn't use a solicitor.
Posted by CC dated 2013-07-22 07:47:54
Hello, I am 33 & have been in full time employment since 2001. I gave up work in 2010 to have the first of my two children and I'm now a full time stay at home Mum. My husband is in full time employment. I opted out of the state pension when I started (later than I should have in 2004!) & was part of a company pension scheme. Should I be opting back in now? What if I decide to go back to work in a few years? Thanks very much!
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-07-23 07:52:19
Hi CC, Thanks for your question. Do you receive child benefit and/or have you filled in the application form (even if you don't receive a payment)? If the answer is 'yes' that will have triggered your state pension credits which will have over-ridden the fact you had 'contracted out' and paid a lower rate of National Insurance while you were working. Incidentally, since April 2012, the rules around contracting out tightened up and you were only able to do this if you were in a workplace salary related pension.
Posted by Hi Sarah dated 2013-07-23 19:42:42
No we no longer receive it. We filled out the forms to say wr didn't want to receive it rather than having to pay it back (think that's what we had to do!). Thanks so much for any advice you're able to give :-)
Posted by Kay dated 2013-08-16 21:24:29
Hi my husband died last month he was 75yrs old he was getting a state pension . I am 37yrs old with a child will I be able to continue to get my late husband pension of 760 pd a month
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-08-17 07:26:52
Hi Kay, Thanks for your question and I'm sorry to hear about your husband's death. I'm assuming, from your question, that the £175 or so a week was from his state pension? If so, you should still be able to make a claim for his state pension, but you probably won't get the full amount of what's called the 'additional state pension' (namely his SERPs and/or state second pension). There are two articles that it might be worth you reading. One is called What happens to your state pension when you die? You can read it by copying and pasting this link: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=819 The other is called 'Will you be able to claim on your husband's record after the flat rate pension is introduced? http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=998 The government is planning to introduce a single tier or flat rate state pension in 2016. After that date many women won't be able to inherit a state pension, but in your situation you should. There may also be bere
Posted by Nev Morvan dated 2013-08-29 20:14:25
Is my wife entitled to a state pension. She is 61. She has only paid just over 2 years NI contributions. I am 61, a retired firefighter with fully paid up NI contributions, which I intend paying until pension age of 65.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-08-31 07:02:20
Hi Nev, Thanks for your question. Under the government's current plans for a single tier or flat rate state pension, your wife is unlikely to be able to receive a state pension based on your contributions unless she has paid the married women's stamp (lower level of National Insurance) at any point in the last 35 years. If she has, she would still be able to claim a state pension of up to 60% of the full amount based on your NI contributions. If she hasn't, the government plans means she won't be able to. I've written an article about it - and you can copy and paste this link to read it: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=998
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-08-31 07:04:27
Hi Nev (part two of response!) I have tried to highlight this as an injustice and did raise it with the Pensions Minister Steve Webb when I had a meeting with him a couple of months ago. You can read his response here: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=1009
Posted by It'sneverme dated 2013-09-12 22:10:02
Hi there, I'm worried sick that when I retire I won't be able to manage, the flat rate will be in place by then so I won't be able to claim on my hubbies contributions, I have hardly any of my own, he has full 30 yrs on his and is due to retire in 4 yrs, if I could claim, would it matter how long we have been married, we have only been married for 5 yrs,
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2013-09-13 10:39:53
Hi itsneverme, Thanks for your comment. Have you paid the married women's stamp (reduced rate of National Insurance) at all? If you have, you'll be able to claim on your husband's National Insurance contribution record. I've written an article about when you can claim on your husband's National Insurance record - which you can read by copying and pasting this link: http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=1029seceret1234 I also mentioned it when I met Steve Webb earlier this year but he said it would only affect 30,000 women and didn't seem to think the policy needed to change. You can read his responses here:http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=1009
Posted by maggiewyattuk@yahoo.co.uk dated 2014-05-15 13:49:43
If you cannot find your ex husbands National Insurance No. what can one do.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-05-15 21:04:53
Hi Maggie
Thanks for the question. I'd suggest that you ring the National Insurance registrations helpline number. You can find the details if you copy and paste this link. Leave me another comment if you have any problems after you've spoken to them as there may be other ways of getting the number. https://www.gov.uk/lost-national-insurance-number
Posted by Tony Sea dated 2014-05-20 10:48:58
Is this website still running? From 2016/17 when my wife will be 64 and can claim can a woman claim on her huisband's Insurance still? If not will she receice credit for bringing up kids and only a few years working and paying stamps?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-05-22 08:03:00
Hi Tony, Yes, the website is still definitely running! Thanks for your comment. From April 2016, your wife would be able to claim a basic state pension based on your National Insurance record if she paid the married women's stamp at any point in the last 35 years. If she didn't, then she'd be unlikely to be able to claim.
Posted by moxy-glenn dated 2014-05-24 18:55:36
hi hoping you can help? My mother in law is claiming her deceased husbands full state pension and also 2 civil service capita pensions. They are prison service and army pension. My father in law died 6 years ago. My mother in law is working also but is also living with her boyfriend for the last 4 years. Is she still entitled to claim all pensions?
Posted by mo dated 2014-05-25 12:33:57
I am 63 yrs claiming a state pension of 80.83 per week, living overseas, my husband and I are divorcing, basically can I claim anymore pension a week?
Posted by Mandy jade dated 2014-05-25 17:09:03
Please can you help me, we live in South Africa and want to move to the Uk. My husband receives a pension id €34 a week (he worked in the UK for 22 years) he will be 81 this year. If we move to the UK what pension and can he get extra to support me, and our 16 year old adopted grandaughter. I am South African and we have been married for 35 years
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-05-28 10:53:48
Hi Moxy Glen,
Thanks for your question. Your mother in law can claim a state pension on her late husband's contributions as long as she does not remarry before she reaches state pension age. As to her civil service pensions, I believe it is likely to depend on which pension scheme she is in (there are different versions of the civil service scheme. I believe that some stop or reduce the pension if you remarry or cohabit but I do not know if all do. She would have to check with Capita.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-05-28 10:58:47
Hi Mo,
Thanks for your question. If you are divorcing your husband, you can substitute his National Insurance record for your own, if his is better, for the years while you were married or while he was working until you divorced. I'd contact the Pension Service (you can find the contact details by copying and pasting this link: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service) or you can ring the free information and advice service, the Pensions Advisory Service. Its contact details are here: http://www.pensionsadvisoryservice.org.uk/ I hope that's useful.
Posted by Lisa dated 2014-06-06 17:31:03
Iam a 63 yr old widow.i get state pension,and gar anted pension credit .will these stop if I remarry?.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-06-07 09:35:20
Hi Lisa,
Thanks for your question. If you're receiving a state pension based on your own National Insurance contributions, you will continue to receive that whether or not you remarry. The guarantee element of Pension Credit is means tested, so if you get married, your husband's income will be taken into account as well as your own. You can read more about it here on the Gov.uk website by copying and pasting this link: https://www.gov.uk/pension-credit/overview If, on the other hand you are getting a state pension based on your late husband's National Insurance record, that will only stop if you remarry before you reach pension age. As you are receiving your state pension already, you could remarry and it would not affect your pension. There's more information about this in my article called 'What happens to your state pension when you die?' http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=819
Posted by Sandra dated 2014-06-12 20:49:23
My pension is £27 a week. Some of this is credit for a child. I paid a married woman's stamp from 1971. I could not work from 1971to 1989. I had 2 children. I looked after my mother with cancer and my father with alziemhers. My ex husband died before I was 60. I was divorced from him by then. I am now 69 yrs old. Am I due to more pension than I'm getting. My now husband is on pension from Belgium.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-06-14 12:45:53
Hi Sandra,
Thanks for your question. Your details are quite complicated, so the best thing may be to ring the Pension Service (you can find their contact details by copying and pasting this link: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service ) or by ringing the Pensions Advisory Service, which is a free to use and independent information and advisory service. You can ring it on 0845 6012923. If you remarried after you reached state pension age, you could claim a state pension on your late husband's NI record, but there may be other ways you can increase your pension income
Posted by Barbara dated 2014-06-26 16:59:17
i am coming up to 60 wishing to retire due to ill health can i claim anything frpm my ex husband's contributions. Barbara
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-06-29 09:23:03
Hi Barbara,
Thanks for your question. You can only claim on your ex husband's National Insurance contributions when you reach state pension age. Assuming you were born in July 1954 (just guessing from your question), you'd reach state pension age in May 2020. That means you will receive the new flat rate state pension. However, you may be able to claim a state pension based on your ex-husband's National Insurance contributions if you paid the reduced rate of National Insurance (ie the Married Women's Stamp) during the last 35 years. You could only receive this pension if both he and you have reached state pension age.
Posted by maroon jerseys dated 2014-07-01 10:36:09
My husband has just applied for his state pension to start in September when he's 65. My pension commenced in April 2013 and is £40 per week more than my husband's will be. Because of this, will my pension be reduced when my husband's starts?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-07-06 08:46:17
Hi Maroon Jerseys,
Thanks for your question. Each of you builds up a state pension in your own right (based on your own National Insurance contribution record), so when your husband receives his state pension, it won't affect the amount you get. You will continue to receive your state pension in full. I hope that is helpful.
Posted by mwatso@hotmail.co.uk dated 2014-07-22 19:47:30
Why dose my husband get more old age pension when we have both worked all our lives , I'm age 66 I finished work April 2012 he finished age 67 2012 ??
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-07-27 09:57:41
Hi Mwatso,
Thanks for your question. Your husband should get the same state pension as you. The trouble is that men generally get a much higher state pension than men because they have more consistent work patterns. As well as the basic state pension, you can earn an 'additional' pension, which is made up of SERPS and/or the state second pension. You only get this if you are employed and people who earn more get a higher additional pension. That could explain why you receive less than your husband.... If you have a further question, just update this question area.
Posted by Margaret dated 2014-08-12 17:44:57
I have just received my state pension forecast it will be £15.70per week as I paid the small stamp.My ex husband doesn't reach his pension age until 2016. How do I live until then?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-08-18 11:00:33
Hi Margaret,
Thanks for your question. I know some women receive a paltry amount of state pension because they paid the married women's stamp, but the amount you're going to get is pretty shocking. You may be able to apply for Pension Credit. This is paid to single people who receive less than £148.35 a week. You can claim it when you reach state pension age. There's more information about Pension Credit on SavvyWoman - you can copy and paste this link to find out more: http://savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s5.php?art_id=1059
Posted by lindsey dated 2014-08-29 10:43:20
I receive a state pension of £13.10 a week. Can I still claim part of my ex husband pension also. I am still single at 66yrs. He is 67yrs. Been divorced 16yrs now. Thank you.
Posted by linsey again dated 2014-08-29 10:54:47
Sorry made a mistake when I read my question to you. Weekly pension is £113.10. Now corrected.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-08-31 08:32:14
Hi Lindsey,
Thanks for your comment. If you receive £113.10 a week you're getting the full basic state pension. That means that if you claimed from your ex husband, you wouldn't get any extra. When you got divorced, pensions couldn't be split at the time of divorce (that was only introduced in 2000), although their value could be taken into account when working out who got what. I'm sorry not to have better news for you.
Posted by sharon dated 2014-09-30 22:47:05
I only have 20yrs ni. Contributions, due to children and low self employed earnings with exemption certificate. Can I get full pension from my husbands, he gets his now. I get mine jan 16. thanks.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-01 10:34:54
Hi Sharon,
Thanks for your question. Does your 20 years include Home Responsibilities Protection or credits for when you were looking after your children? Make sure it does! If that's your full entitlement, you'd only be able to claim a state pension worth 60% of the full basic state pension on your husband's NI contribution record and even then, only from January 2016 when you reach state pension age.
Posted by Maureen dated 2014-10-06 14:21:42
i worked full time foe many years but was advised to only pay a married woman's stamp. I now receive a works pension, will I be entitled to a state pension using my husbands contributions. He now receives his state pension
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-11 11:18:15
Hi Maureen,
Thanks for your question. If you've reached state pension age you can claim a state pension of up to 60% of the full basic state pension based on your husband's NI contribution history. Both you and your husband have to have reached state pension age. It's called a 'category B' pension.
Posted by whats this ? dated 2014-10-16 14:32:13
I M PLEASED TO KNOW I CAN CLAIM ON MY HUSBANDS N I RECORD WHAT IF HE WON T GIVE ME HIS NIN?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-18 10:58:54
Hi What's this,
Thanks for your question. I'll get in touch with the DWP and find out what the process is. I have had queries about this before and I do remember that there is a way to make a claim, but I'll check how you should proceed and update this section.
Posted by cow bag dated 2014-10-20 00:35:01
My X husband was sent to 7 yrs in prison for money laundering in 2007. I was left with nothing homeless penny less and with 2 babies to look after. He went bankruptcy at the time of our divorce. He has now come in to a lot of money. How to I get my hands on his beloved money. He pays csa for what it's with but I want to hurt him like he hurt my family!!! What to do? I really want to nail him for the hurt he has caused my children. Help please.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-21 07:41:30
Hi Cowbag,
Thanks for your question and I'm sorry to hear that your divorce was so difficult. When most couples get divorced, if they use a solicitor (or even if they don't), the financial settlement will be finalised by a court order. This normally ensures that either partner cannot make any other claim against the other for a share of their money or property (a 'clean break' settlement). The idea is that both can get on with their lives financially. If you didn't divide the finances at the time or if you did so informally and didn't get a court order, or if you personally were receiving maintenance (rather than support for your children) you may be able to make a further claim. The Child Maintenance Service (which has replaced the CSA) may be able to reopen your case, but the rules aren't straightforward. One word of warning - while I understand that you want to punish your ex for what he's done, the legal system doesn't work like this.
Posted by Lizzie dated 2014-10-23 20:26:02
Very helpful. But a question... I claim my pension on my husbands NI if he dies do I get a widowers pension
Posted by Marijke49 dated 2014-10-24 15:39:06
My husband and I have run into serious marriage difficulties which has included abuse. He is 77 and I am 65. He has always paid into his pension all his working life and we both receive our pensions. My question is - if this marriage ends in divorce - my personal present income mounts to £600 p m including the state pension. Will I be able to get any top- up when I have to live on my own? I can only show figures that I have less than £13 000 once I am single again. I won't be able to rely on any/ much alimony from him. And should I get alimony from him - this would push my allowed amount up too high, wouldn't it? Thank you.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-26 08:26:07
Hi Lizzie,
Thanks for your question. You might find this article, on what happens to your state pension when you die, useful. In basic terms, you can use your late husband or civil partner's National Insurance record instead of your own when he or she dies, if it is better than yours. If you copy and paste a link to the article, you can find out more: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=819
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-26 08:32:29
Dear Marijke49,
Thanks for your question and I'm sorry to hear about the situation you find yourself in. I would strongly recommend that you make an appointment with a divorce lawyer who is a member of Resolution - even if you then decide to sort out your divorce yourself. Unless your marriage is a very short one (normally five years or less), whatever you have would be divided between you on the basis of what you each need financially. Just because your husband paid into the pension doesn't mean he'd get to keep it. And it is possible to divide a pension even after retirement. I'm enclosing a link to an article about how to find a divorce lawyer, which you may find useful: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c8-pages/c8s2.php?art_id=955 If you are looking for benefits advice, I'd contact Citizens Advice (they can give advice over the phone or online, in some cases) or an organisation such as IncomeMax (here's a link to their website) http://www.incomemax.co.uk/
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-29 17:55:13
Hi What'sthis,
I've found out the second part of your answer. Apologies that it's taken so long but I wanted to check it directly with the DWP. As there's a word limit on each comment box, I've copied and pasted the answer in the next comment box.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-29 17:57:17
Hi Whatsthis,
This is what the DWP said: If she is due to reach the state pension age in the next 4 months she should contact the Pension Service. Details are here: https://www.gov.uk/contact-pension-service If she doesn’t have 30 qualifying years in her own right, then she should provide them with the dates of the marriage and her basic state pension will take their time married into account. She will not need her ex husband's National Insurance number for this. If she is due to reach State Pension age before April 2016, and in more than 4 months, she should contact the Future Pension Centre to get an estimate of her State Pension. https://www.gov.uk/future-pension-centre She should provide details of her ex-husband, name, date of birth and his NI Number if possible etc. The team will try to trace the NI number for her if she hasn’t got it. If the NI cannot be traced, the statement would be based on her own NI record – but once she is closer to retirement a
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-10-29 17:58:30
Hi Whatsthis,
Here's the second part of the answer: The team will try to trace the NI number for her if she hasn’t got it . If the NI cannot be traced, the statement would be based on her own NI record – but once she is closer to retirement age, a clearer picture will be provided (above) I hope this is useful to you
Posted by Ted dated 2014-10-31 12:06:32
How can I obtain my Husbands NI Number if he won't provide it ?
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-11-01 09:33:41
Hi Ted,
Thanks for your question. The answer to the question from Whatsthis (which is just above your question) is to exactly the same question. It spreads over two comments boxes. I hope it makes sense but leave another comment if you have any questions once you've read it. Thanks
Posted by mo dated 2014-11-03 13:50:07
I was first married in 1961 my then husband was in the RAF and we lived abroad for 6 years. When we came back to UK our second child was born.I was unable to work as my son needed special care and in 1986 we were divorced. I re-married later and helped my new husband in our business. My point is I only receive £325 per month in State Pension, which to my mind is extremely poor, I brought up 2 children, was never a draw on the state but now I feel as though I am being persecuted for being a caring Mum
Posted by Willowand dated 2014-11-12 23:18:29
I left my husband over 30 years ago but never divorced him. When I worked I didn't pay enough NI to get a full State pension. I live with another man but even with his pension it's hard making ends meet. Can I claim any additional pension, based on my husband's contributions ? I'm worried I'll be told I've managed all this time without any help so I don't need it now. Also, as he never paid anything towards our daughters upbringing after we left, is it too late to claim anything for them, even though he has come into a lot of money ?
Posted by mary dated 2014-11-13 10:21:51
have fully paid up nat. insurance,working from 16 years old to my now 59,is witholding my pension till i'm 66 'really' legal,when convicted murderers are getting their pension when released today.......
Posted by Cfcxxx dated 2014-11-17 14:54:04
I married in England in 1967 and later moved to scotland where I now stay. In 1988 my husband walked out and never came back. He was the only income provider so I then had to claim state benefits. I have had no financial help from him or no child mantanance.we are both now retired and I get pension credit and £3.88 state pension weekly I no savings etc. My daughter has recently tracked him down he living in burnley with his new partner. I have never remarried and want to know my rights. I'm I still legally married? What am I entilted to if anything. Can I sue for never paying for children while I have had to get into years of debt to make sure kids had what they needed.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-11-17 16:29:30
Hi Willowand,
Thanks for your question. If you and your husband are not divorced but are separated, you may/should be able to claim a state pension based on his National Insurance contribution, worth 60% of the amount he was due to receive. You can only claim this when he reaches state pension age (although he doesn't have to be claiming his state pension in order for you to claim). The rules will change for couples or those who are divorced and who reach state pension age from April 6th 2016, so I hope you will qualify for yours before then. this isn't affected if you live with your partner but you would lose this right if you were to remarry before you reach state pension age. Re child maintenance, I'm not sure what the position is. I think it would depend on whether you had an agreement in place that was enforceable or whether you had an informal agreement (or none at all). I'd talk to a solicitor who's a member of Resolution and see what they suggest. http://www.resolution.org.
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-11-17 16:38:41
Hi Mary,
Thanks for your commment. I am amazed that the government thought it was appropriate to raise the state pension age to 66 - when women were already experiencing a rise in state pension age to 65. I'm afraid it is legal, although that doesn't make it right. There is a petition you can sign which you can find here: https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/revert-to-the-governments-promise-regarding-no-increase-in-the-state-pension-age-until-2016-2012
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-11-17 16:49:02
Dear Cfcxxx,
Thanks for your question. If you've separated but not divorced you are still legally married. You would have had to sign something to agree to either legal separation or divorce. I had a question very similar to yours which I answered below. In terms of getting maintenance or child support, I don't know how easy that will be but I would suggest you talk to a solicitor who is a member of the Scottish Family Law Association (their website is here: http://www.familylawassociation.org/ ). Some solicitors will give you a preliminary advice session for free. They will at least tell you whether there is anything you can do and what it might involve. Regarding your state pension, as you are still married, you may be able to claim a state pension worth 60% of the amount your husband would receive, when he reaches state pension age. He doesn't have to claim his state pension for you to receive it. However, it may not help you much if you get Pension Credit. Have you had a benefi
Posted by margt grinstead dated 2014-12-14 13:33:35
I am just wid0wed What is my years state pensi0n I am 78
Posted by Sarah Pennells dated 2014-12-15 09:53:57
Hi Margaret,
Thanks for your question. I don't know how much state pension you're receiving at the moment. If you're already getting the full basic state pension of £113.10, you won't get any additional basic pension, but you can make a claim for your late husband's additional pension. If you don't get the full basic state pension, you may be able to use your late husband's National Insurance record instead of your own. You can read more about it in my article (if you copy and paste this link: http://www.savvywoman.co.uk/c7-pages/c7s1.php?art_id=819 ). If you want more information, ring the Pensions Advisory Service on 0300 123 1047.

 
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